Archive for the ‘VoIP’ Category

Microsoft (SFB/O365) Dropping Support for PBX Connections leaving Legacy Platforms behind

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

Microsoft recently announced that it will no longer provide session border controller (SBC) support for PBX systems accessing Office 365.

Essentially, the news means that starting July 2018, users of Exchange Online Unified Messaging (UM) will have to use an alternative method of connecting voicemail with Outlook. Microsoft won’t support PBX connections using SBCs for that purpose.

In its announcement, Microsoft suggested that only “a small number of customers are affected by this change” and that it was making it to “provide a higher quality of service for voicemail.” Microsoft also offered four alternative options, though they likely won’t be cheap or simple for affected organizations, said Paul Cunningham, a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional, commenting in a Practical 365 blog post. The move could simplify things for Microsoft, though, he suggested.

“I see this simply as part of Microsoft’s grand strategy to jettison legacy platforms and solutions that are complex and not highly profitable, and focus on services like Cloud PBX that they can deliver more efficiently,” Cunningham added.

Microsoft is discontinuing its SBC support on the Office 365 side so that it won’t have to rely on “a third-party system” that’s difficult to manage, suggested Jeff Guillet, a Microsoft certified solutions master and Microsoft MVP. He explained the technical aspects of Microsoft’s move in this blog post, adding that giving companies just one year to move is “asking a lot,” since the switchover likely will affect large companies.

Some Help for Orgs
Meanwhile, AVST, a Microsoft Gold partner on Skype for Business and Exchange, and a voicemail pioneer, is indicating that it has the means to support organizations faced with Microsoft’s one-year deadline.

The company’s CX-E Unified Communications platform offers a quick solution that can integrate with leading PBX systems, such as systems from Avaya, Cisco, Microsoft and others. The platform permits organizations to continue to use Outlook forms to link voicemail with e-mail. Because of the potential pain involved in such moves, it’s currently offering discounts via its Value-Added Reseller partners.

How AVST can address the issue was explained by Tom Minifie, AVST’s chief technology officer, as well as Denny Michael, senior vice president of sales and marketing at AVST, in a phone interview last week.

AVST has been addressing the unified communications space for decades.

“The company goes back over 30 years and we were one of the folks that brought voicemail to the marketplace,” Michael said. “We’ve been around for a long time, and we primarily service the enterprise space. We’re very strong in healthcare, state and local government, regulated industries, higher education and other horizontal industries as well.”

Minifie explained that organizations with third-party (or non-Microsoft) PBX systems using Office 365, or thinking about moving to Office 365, will be affected by Microsoft’s change. Most options, of the four listed by Microsoft, will require moving to Skype for Business and scrapping PBX systems. It’ll be “disruptive,” he said.

“Clearly, from Microsoft’s position, they want that alternative to be ‘Get rid of your PBX and use Skype for Business,'” Minifie said. “So, for customers that have already been planning for that, that’s a good option for them. They move to Skype for Business and continue to use the Exchange [Online] UM component. But for customers that aren’t interested in doing that or aren’t ready to do that, then this is pretty disruptive because it’s not something that they’ve planned for already.”

AVST, with its CX-E Unified Communications platform, specializes in the fourth option presented by Microsoft.

“And what that is, it’s really saying is that instead of directly connecting the Exchange [Online] UM environment to the PBX, I’m going to have a different unified messaging solution that performs that same functionality, and that’s how we approach it,” Minifie said. “Because of our history, we evolved the integrations into the various phone systems, so whatever phone system or PBX the customer is using, we’ll be able to integrate into that, but then we also integrate into the Exchange environment so that we can provide unified messaging through Exchange.”

End users also get the same familiar Outlook look and feel with AVST’s platform.

“In our eyes, we’re providing the best of both worlds,” Minifie said. “We’re solving the problem, which is you can no longer connect Exchange [Online] UM into your PBX. So we take care of that PBX connection. But you get to continue to use the familiar Outlook interface that the end users are used to.”

Minifie affirmed that Microsoft was essentially eliminating the SBC on its end. The change was aimed at improving the quality of service of voicemail, according to Microsoft.

The Time Factor
AVST and its partners validate phone systems and architectures. They perform application discovery to address any functionalities that organization may want. The time it takes to deploy will depend on the solution chosen.

“As far as the amount of time, that kind of depends on the solution,” Minifie said. “Ours is quick because you really aren’t changing anything. Your phone system doesn’t change. Your Exchange doesn’t change. We just get put in the middle of it. And so that can be deployed very quickly.”

Other approaches can get delayed.

“With the other solutions, you’re getting into having to order telecom things,” Minifie said. “You need SIP trunking and have to order from the carrier, and there are whatever delays for that to get delivered.”

AVST’s solution can be installed on premises or it’s provided as a hosted software-as-a-service solution via subscription. More information about AVST’s replacement offerings for Exchange Online UM can be found at this page.

By Kurt Mackie

About the Author

Kurt Mackie is senior news producer for the 1105 Enterprise Computing Group.

Source: Microsoft Dropping Support for PBX Connections Using SBCs — Redmond Channel Partner

Understanding Open Source Agility – Watching revenue upside in SD-WAN, UCaaS services.

Thursday, July 13th, 2017
“A penny saved is a penny earned” –Wise Anonymous person’s words that I heard from my mother growing up.
R O I should be an initial checkpoint and a major focus of any technological investment.  What is the solution solving?  I can’t stop adding items to the list.  I found the article below rather interesting – The service and cloud scene is poppin right now.
–Aaron
business meeting

SatPhone Encrypted Calls Can be Cracked in Fractions of a Second

Thursday, July 13th, 2017

Decrypting-Satellite-Phone-Calls

Security researchers have discovered a new method to decrypt satellite phone communications encrypted with the GMR-2 cipher in “real time” — that too in mere fractions of a second in some cases.

The new attack method has been discovered by two Chinese security researchers and is based on previous research by German academicians in 2012, showing that the phone’s encryption can be cracked so quickly that attackers can listen in on calls in real time.

The research, disclosed in a paper published last week by the security researchers in the International Association for Cryptologic Research, focused on the GMR-2 encryption algorithm that is commonly being used in most modern satellite phones, including British satellite telecom Inmarsat, to encrypt voice calls in order to prevent eavesdropping.

Unlike previous 2012 research by German researchers who tried to recover the encryption key with the help of ‘plaintext’ attacks, the Chinese researchers attempted to “reverse the encryption procedure to deduce the encryption-key from the output keystream directly.”

The attack method requires hitting a 3.3GHz satellite stream thousands of times with an inversion attack, which eventually produces the 64-bit encryption key and makes it easier to hunt for the decryption key, allowing attackers to decrypt communications and listen in to a conversation.

“This indicates that the inversion attack is very efficient and practical which could lead to a real time crack on the GMR-2 cipher,” the research paper reads. “The experimental results on a 3.3GHz platform demonstrate that the 64-bit encryption-key can be completely retrieved in around 0.02s.”

According to the duo, the attack can eventually crack the satellite phone call encryption in a fraction of a second when carried out successfully, allowing the attacker to break into the communications in real time for live eavesdropping.

The new findings spark concerns surrounding the security of satellite phones, which are mostly used by field officers in war zones that protect our land, air, and water, as well as people in remote area precisely because of no other alternatives.

Such attacks could pose a significant threat to satellite phone users’ privacy.

“Given that the confidentiality is a very crucial aspect in satellite communications, the encryption algorithms in the satellite phones should be strong enough to withstand various eavesdropping risks,” researchers said.

“This again demonstrates that there exists serious security flaws in the GMR-2 cipher, and it is crucial for service providers to upgrade the cryptographic modules of the system in order to provide confidential communication,” researchers concluded.

The research was carried out by Jiao Hu, Ruilin Li and Chaojing Tang of National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, China. For more details, you can head on to their research paper [PDF], titled “A Real-time Inversion Attack on the GMR-2 Cipher Used in the Satellite Phones.”

Story Credit ::
Swati - Hacking News
Technical Writer, Security Blogger and IT Analyst.
She is a Technology Enthusiast with a keen eye on the Cyberspace and other tech related developments.

Ting sets Sandpoint, Idaho as its next 1 Gbps broadband target

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

If Ting sees enough interest in service after completing its “demand assessment” phase, Ting says that network construction will begin later this year.

Google Fiber (NASDAQ: GOOG) and other large telcos like AT&T (NYSE: T) have gained national attention for their 1 Gbps FTTH builds in major cities like Atlanta and Austin, Texas. But Ting said its goal is to bring similar capabilities to areas like Sandpoint where the population is less than 10,000 people.

“While it’s obviously very important to get major metros connected with fast fiber Internet, Ting Internet is proving that the fastest Internet access available isn’t just for city centers,” said Elliot Noss, CEO of Ting and its parent company Tucows. “Smaller cities and towns need faster, more reliable Internet too. Maybe even more so.”

Sandpoint will be the fourth area where Ting offers its FTTH service.

In early 2015, Ting launched FTTH service Charlottesville, Va. followed by Westminster, Md., later that year. In early 2016, Ting Internet began demand generation and assessment in Holly Springs, N.C.

Although network installation costs vary by location, Ting said they are not more than $200 for a home or $400 for an individual business. The Ting Internet Box, which doubles as a high speed wireless router, costs $199 up front or a user can pay $9 a month for the device.

Eligible residential customers can get a 1 Gbps connection for $89, while business services are available for $139 a month. The service provider is also offer a symmetrical 5 Mbps service for $19 a month.

Ting is taking its 1 Gbps FTTH show to the Sandpoint, Idaho area with plans to offer the service to residents in the communities of Sandpoint, Dover, Ponderay and Kootenai.Similar to the way it launched services in Holly Springs, N.C. and in Virginia, interested residents and businesses that reside in these towns can pre-order service by going to the ting.com/sandpoint site.The service provider said that pre-orders will impact not just when Ting starts bringing service to a town, but also where it will begin its network buildout.

 

Source: Ting sets Sandpoint, Idaho as its next 1 Gbps broadband target – FierceTelecom

Password hash cracking on a Juniper ScreenOS device

Monday, January 4th, 2016

So the Juniper Netscreen/SSG ScreenOS password hash is a bit of a hidden mystery. I had in my hand the config of a Netscreen device and I wanted to perform a reverse of the password hashes to see if they were weak.

In this case here’s the line from the config:

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set admin user “admin” password “nAePB0rfAm+Nc4YO3s0JwPHtRXIHdn” privilege “all”

John The ripper has supported Netscreen passwords since back in 2008 when Samuel Moñux released this patch. Unfortunately John was too slow for my needs as I was up against a deadline, thus I looked at the faster approach of using the GPU to perform the cracking. Hashcat is the best tool for the job but unfortunately Hashcat didn’t support this hashing algorithm. :-(

After a looking through jar source code I found this python script which can generate a Netscreen hash, getting warmer. Here’s a shortened version of the code to show just the function we’re interested in:

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def makepass(user, password):
middle = “Administration Tools”
s = “%s:%s:%s” % (user, middle, password)
print s
m = hashlib.md5(s).digest()
narray = []for i in range(8):
n1 = ord(m[2*i])
n2 = ord(m[2*i+1])
narray.append( (n1<<8 & 0xff00) | (n2 & 0xff) )

res = “”
for i in narray:
p1 = i >> 12 & 0xf
p2 = i >> 6  & 0x3f
p3 = i       & 0x3f
res += b64[p1] + b64[p2] + b64[p3]

for c, n in  zip(“nrcstn”, [0, 6, 12, 17, 23, 29]):
res = res[:n] + c + res[n:]
return res

After looking through the code it is clear that there is a fixed salt of Administration Tools and a salt of the username(lines 2 and 3).
The code then takes each 2 chars and adds the binaries together(lines 8-11)
From this it creates 3 characters from the 16bits(lines 14-18)
And finally is scatters the letters n,r,c,s,t & n onto the hash in specific places (lines 20 and 21)
It’s worth noting that the letters nrcstn is actually NeTSCReeN in reverse without the e’s :-)

Using this code it was possible to write some new code to reverse backwards through the steps in order to go from a Netscreen hash back to the raw MD5 hash. Here’s the function for this:

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def reversetomd5(knownhash):
# strip out nrcstn fixed characters
clean=“”
for i in [1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10,11,13,14,15,16,18,19,20,21,22,24,25,26,27,28]:
clean+=knownhash[i]# create blocks
block=[]
for i in xrange(2,24,3):
p1 = b64.index(clean[i-2])
p2 = b64.index(clean[i-1])
p3 = b64.index(clean[i])
block.append(p1 << 12 | p2 << 6 | p3)

# split block into half and find out character for each decimal
md5hash=“”
for i in block:
n1 = i >> 8
n2 = i & 0xff
md5hash+=chr(n1)+chr(n2)
return binascii.hexlify(md5hash)

Using this function you are able to give it a Netscreen hash and you’ll get back the raw MD5.

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Knownhash of:nAePB0rfAm+Nc4YO3s0JwPHtRXIHdn has MD5Hash of: 078f1d1f09bede18edf49c0f745781dd

Now using the power of GPU cracking and my favourite tool Hashcat it is possible to crack the hash. We need to put the hash in a format that hashcat can understand so we create a file called netscreen.txt and put the hash in the following format(note the training colon after the fixed salt):

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[hash]:[user]:Administration Tools:
078f1d1f09bede18edf49c0f745781dd:admin:Administration Tools:

We then use hashcat’s mode 20 which is md5($salt.$pass) to crack the hash:

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C:\cudaHashcat64.exe -m 20 netscreen.txt rockyou.txt
cudaHashcat v1.01 starting…
Hashes: 1 total, 1 unique salts, 1 unique digests
Bitmaps: 8 bits, 256 entries, 0x000000ff mask, 1024 bytes
Watchdog: Temperature abort trigger set to 90c
Watchdog: Temperature retain trigger set to 80c
Device #1: GeForce GTX 660M, 2048MB, 950Mhz, 2MCU
Device #1: Kernel ./kernels/4318/m0020_a0.sm_30.64.ptx
Device #1: Kernel ./kernels/4318/bzero.64.ptxGenerated dictionary stats for rockyou.txt: 139921541 bytes, 14344395 words, 14343300 keyspace

078f1d1f09bede18edf49c0f745781dd:admin:Administration Tools::MySecretPassword

Session.Name…: cudaHashcat
Status………: Cracked
Input.Mode…..: File (rockyou.txt)
Hash.Target….: 078f1d1f09bede18edf49c0f745781dd:admin:Administration Tools:
Hash.Type……: md5($salt.$pass)
Time.Started…: Fri Jan 10 15:03:24 2014 (5 secs)
Speed.GPU.#1…:  4886.1 kH/s
Recovered……: 1/1 (100.00%) Digests, 1/1 (100.00%) Salts
Progress…….: 11109723/14343300 (77.46%)
Rejected…….: 1371/11109723 (0.01%)
HWMon.GPU.#1…:  0% Util, 41c Temp, N/A Fan

Started: Fri Jan 10 15:03:24 2014
Stopped: Fri Jan 10 15:03:32 2014

Bingo it’s cracked the hash with the password MySecretPassword

As this algorithm uses more than just a fixed salt to create the hash I’ll speak to Atom (the creator of hashcat) to see if he want’s to implement it into a future release, but until then this code should help you in cracking netscreen passwords.

Update: Atom has added this hash type to oclHashcat as of version 1.20 https://hashcat.net/hashcat/ (Feature request here: https://hashcat.net/trac/ticket/235)

 

This article’s Original Author:

https://www.phillips321.co.uk/2014/01/10/cracking-a-juniper-netscreen-screenos-password-hash/

InfoSec Diary – Putty 0.64 released last week with New Features!

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Putty 0.64 released last week (sorry, we missed it) – private-key-not-wiped-2 and diffie-hellman-range-check security issues resolved.

These features are new in beta 0.64 (released 2015-02-28):

  • Security fix: PuTTY no longer retains the private half of users’ keys in memory by mistake after authenticating with them. See private-key-not-wiped-2. (Sorry! We thought we’d fixed that in 0.63, but missed one.)
  • Support for SSH connection sharing, so that multiple instances of PuTTY to the same host can share a single SSH connection instead of all having to log in independently.
  • Command-line and configuration option to specify the expected host key(s).
  • Defaults change: PuTTY now defaults to SSH-2 only, instead of its previous default of SSH-2 preferred.
  • Local socket errors in port-forwarded connections are now recorded in the PuTTY Event Log.
  • Bug fix: repeat key exchanges in the middle of an SSH session now never cause an annoying interactive host key prompt.
  • Bug fix: reset the bolded-text default setting back to what it used to be. (0.63 set it to something wrong, as a side effect of refactoring.)
  • Bug fix: IPv6 literals are handled sensibly throughout the suite, if you enclose them in square brackets to prevent the colons being mistaken for a :port suffix.
  • Bug fix: IPv6 dynamic port forwardings should work again.

See http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/ and http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/changes.html

via InfoSec Handlers Diary Blog – Putty 0.64 released last week (sorry, we missed it) – private-key-not-wiped-2 and diffie-hellman-range-check security issues resolved. See http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/ and http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/changes.html.

Record-breaking 1Tbps Speed achieved Over 5G Mobile Connection – Hacker News

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

New Generations usually bring new base technologies, more network capacity for more data per user, and high speed Internet service, for which Internet service providers usually advertise. However, it is believed that the fifth generation (5G Technology) of mobile network will be beyond our thoughts.1TBPS OVER 5GSecurity researchers from the University of Surrey have just achieved Record-Breaking data speeds during a recent test of 5G wireless data connections, achieving an incredible One Terabit per second (1Tbps) speed – many thousands of times faster than the existing 4G connections.After 4G, 5G is the next generation of mobile communication technology that aims at offering far greater capacity and be faster, more energy-efficient and more cost-effective than anything that has seen before. The boffins say 5G will be different – very different.The 5G test was conducted at the university’s 5G Innovation Centre (5GIC), which was founded by a host of telecoms industry partners including Huawei, Fujitsu, Samsung, Vodafone, EE, Aircom, BT, Telefonica, Aeroflex, BBC and Rohde & Schwarz.

via Record-breaking 1Tbps Speed achieved Over 5G Mobile Connection – Hacker News.

Information Regarding Server Issues for VyprVPN Customers in China | Golden Frog

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

We are aware of recent network issues affecting our VyprVPN customers in China. If you are in China and are having trouble connecting to several different VPN server locations, including US and Australia servers, please use the following locations:

Netherlands

Hong Kong

Connections to these locations have been successful, but may not have a 100% success rate. In the event one of those locations fails, please try another.

Thank you for your patience in this matter. We are investigating the issue and will provide you with an update once we have additional information.

via Information Regarding Server Issues for VyprVPN Customers in China | Golden Frog.

Google and Microsoft step in to oppose Marriott Hotels’ Wi-Fi blocking petition | The Verge

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Marriot Hotels
A petition to grant hoteliers the right to block personal Wi-Fi on their premises is being met with staunch opposition from the biggest technology companies. Google and Microsoft are among those who have filed objections, noting the illegality of any devices capable of interfering with radio signals.

Marriott has been fined for blocking wi-fi connections before

Recode writes that hotel company Marriott International and the American Hospitality & Lodging Association had petitioned the FCC to allow hotel operators to utilize equipment to manage their networks, regardless of whether it may result “in interference with or cause interference to” devices used by guests. This followed a $600,000 settlement case in October, when it was discovered that the employees of Marriott’s Gaylord Opryland Hotel & Convention Center were using a jammer to block off internet access.

Microsoft laid out its arguments against the petition in the filing, stating that a Wi-Fi hotspot set up by a hotel guest is authorized to operate in the unlicensed spectrum, and pointing out that “wilfully excluding these other authorized devices from using that unlicensed spectrum, under the guise of mitigating so-called threats to the reliability (performance) of an operator’s own network, violates Section 333,” which bars “wilful or malicious interference” to radio signals.” The company also pointed out that by restricting the ability to set up their own connections, Marriott would be forcing the customer to pay to access the hotel’s own Wi-Fi, having already paid their mobile operator for the ability to set up a hotspot anywhere.

The hotel chain had argued that it wasn’t breaking the law, but was protecting its guests from “rogue wireless hotspots that can cause degraded service, insidious cyber attacks and identity theft.” But Marriott’s arguments are weak, as there are several examples that show guests are far safer jumping onto their own personal Wi-Fi hotspots than they are connecting to a potentially compromised hotel Wi-Fi network. In November, for example, Kaspersky Labs discovered a group of hackers targeting high-profile business executives who were working from luxury hotels.

via Google and Microsoft step in to oppose Marriott Hotels’ Wi-Fi blocking petition | The Verge.

Google Releases ‘nogotofail’ Network Traffic Security Testing Tool

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

 

 

Google Releases 'nogotofail' Network Traffic Security Testing Tool

Google introduced a new security tool to help developers detect bugs and security glitches in the network traffic security that may leave passwords and other sensitive information open to snooping.

The open source tool, dubbed as Nogotofail, has been launched by the technology giant in sake of a number of vulnerabilities discovered in the implementation of the transport layer security, from the most critical Heartbleed bug in OpenSSL to the Apple’s gotofail bug to the recent POODLE bug in SSL version 3.
The company has made the Nogotofail tool available on GitHub, so that so anyone can test their applications, contribute new features to the project, provide support for more platforms, and help improve the security of the internet.
Android security engineer Chad Brubaker said that the Nogotofail main purpose is to confirm that internet-connected devices and applications aren’t vulnerable to transport layer security (TLS) and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption issues.
The network security testing tool includes testing for common SSL certificate verification issues, HTTPS and TLS/SSL library vulnerabilities and misconfigurations, SSL and STARTTLS stripping issues, and clear text traffic issues, and more.

Google is committed to increasing the use of TLS/SSL in all applications and services. But ‘HTTPS everywhere’ is not enough; it also needs to be used correctly,” Brubaker wrote in a blog post.

Most platforms and devices have secure defaults, but some applications and libraries override the defaults for the worse, and in some instances we’ve seen platforms make mistakes as well. As applications get more complex, connect to more services, and use more third party libraries, it becomes easier to introduce these types of mistakes.

Nogotofail tool, written by Android engineers Chad Brubaker, Alex Klyubin and Geremy Condra, works on devices running Android, iOS, Linux, Windows, Chrome OS, OS X, and “in fact any device you use to connect to the Internet.” The tool can be deployed on a router, a Linux machine, or a VPN server.
The company says it has been using the Nogotofail tool internally for “some time” and has worked with developers to improve the security of their apps before releasing it. “But we want the use of TLS/SSL to advance as quickly as possible,” Brubaker said.
The Nogotofail tool requires Python 2.7 and pyOpenSSL>=0.13. It features an on-path network Man-in-the-Middle (MiTM), designed to work on Linux machines, as well and optional clients for the devices being tested.

via Google Releases ‘nogotofail’ Network Traffic Security Testing Tool.